Paint on hardboard

I have been using a piece of hardboard as a trial “wall” for We Are Forest, testing the paint system over a base coat of emulsion, and trying out some ideas for the finished piece.

Amanda

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Goodbye to Blake’s Lock

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It was a good last day today, despite the rain. We had our busiest day to date, with well over 30 visitors in a shorter day than any other. There weren’t any new sales, but there were many interesting – and interested – people.

There was also a flotilla of kayakers who seemed to be having a lesson in the river Kennet immediately downstream of the Turbine House.

It was a delightful venue, and we’re not ruling out an Artikinesian return there at some point in the future…

Four days to go!

I’ve been spending so much time at the Turbine House recently, and it’s such a great location, that I think I shall miss it after we close our exhibition at 3 pm on Saturday. (I won’t miss the traffic in Reading, though.) Water all around (and under our feet), exceptional views, handsome historic engineering, and a splendid exhibition to show…

Much of my contribution to that exhibition is about the surface of the water. Today, during a quiet spell, I used nearly every media that I had to hand to try and portray the energy of the rushing wave patterns generated by the weir. The resulting sketch is shown above, but you can see my other (more considered) studies of the river’s ever-changing surface as part of the Artikinesis at Blake’s Lock exhibition.

The Turbine House,
part of the Riverside Museum at Blake’s Lock,
off Kenavon Drive, Reading, RG1 3DH

(access through car park of the Bel and Dragon restaurant)

10:00 to 18:00 until 30 September; 10:00 to 15:00 on the final day, 1 October

A tiny tale from the Turbine House

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While looking after our exhibition at the Turbine House today, Brian and I were surprised to spy a little boat chugging up the Kennet towards us. Now, the Turbine House juts out over a weir that spans the river; there’s no way past that weir on that side of the island (unless you’re a crazy canoeist going downriver, but that was a different incident on a different day, and yes, he survived unscathed). At first, we assumed that they were lost and would eventually turn round and pass on the other side of the island, through the lock. But the vessel, with its three occupants and a trailed dinghy full of gear , carried on and moored to one of the Turbine House’s piers just below a window.

The young men in the vessel produced rods and lines and began to fish. A resident of one of the riverside houses came to the foot of his garden to talk to them. Our windows don’t open, so it was a silent scene, but we imagined that the conversation was about fishing rights. The householder retired and the trio carried on casting and attending to their lines. It was quite surprising how active they were, but one of their number kept his position well enough for me to make a quick sketch before a couple of visitors arrived in the gallery.

As far as I could tell, the only catch that the boaters made was a bright green football that had been bobbing around that stretch of water for a few days, but I could easily be mistaken.

What can you see?

So enquires the information board in the Turbine House. What can you see?

An interesting building, made to house fascinating technology. Fabulous views. And a selection of art and poetry that was made to evoke the space it currently inhabits.

Here’s a photograph.

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And here’s the rest of the drawing (made from the opposite corner during a lull)

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Artikinesis at Blake’s Lock, Reading.

Open 10 to 6 daily until 30 September, 10 to 3 on the final day, 1 October.

 

The first view…

This is a photograph taken from the Turbine House’s entrance lobby.

The space is modest, but appealing; walking out over the water, hearing the sound of the river, seeing contrasting views of urban life to the right, tree-lined waterway to the left, with the massive, caged remains of Victorian power transmission embedded within the room … and you encounter an exhibition of artistic vision and poetic words designed specifically for this space, to evoke this space.

This is Artkinesis at Blake’s Lock.

It needs to be seen.